The art of losing isn’t hard to master so many things seem filled with the intent to be lost that their loss is no disaster.

One Art
BY ELIZABETH BISHOP
The art of losing isn’t hard to master;
so many things seem filled with the intent
to be lost that their loss is no disaster.
Lose something every day. Accept the fluster
of lost door keys, the hour badly spent.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.
Then practice losing farther, losing faster:
places, and names, and where it was you meant
to travel. None of these will bring disaster.
I lost my mother’s watch. And look! my last, or
next-to-last, of three loved houses went.
The art of losing isn’t hard to master.
I lost two cities, lovely ones. And, vaster,
some realms I owned, two rivers, a continent.
I miss them, but it wasn’t a disaster.
—Even losing you (the joking voice, a gesture
I love) I shan’t have lied. It’s evident
the art of losing’s not too hard to master
though it may look like (Write it!) like disaster.
response must : cite author and title, incorporate the question, present a focused thesis in the introduction , consistently use present; use quotes to support statements followed by paragraph ( stanzas,) number in parenthesis (par #);avoid personalizing language like “I think”; use summary only as support. also your analysis can be on an expanded question such as -Identify a general rhyme scheme assigning letters
–Mention the exact technical name for the poem’s meter
–Discuss other patterns of sound and how those devices create emphasis. What images, ideas or emotions are being emphasized? or on a new focus of your choice. thank you

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Approximately 250 words