Discuss ways in which indigenous peoples “are still trying to survive” despite claims of the end of imperialism, post-colonialism, and globalization.

Overview
Required Readings
You will be prompted to complete the following readings as you work through this module:
In your Smith textbook, Decolonizing Methodologies:
Smith, L. (2012). Decolonizing methodologies: Research and Indigenous peoples. (2nd Edition). New York: St. Martin’s Press.

Chapter 5: Notes from Down Under
Chapter 6: The Indigenous Peoples’ Project: Setting a New Agenda
With Module 7 you will return to the two themes introduced in Module 1 (the role of research in the process of colonization, and the centrality of relationships within an Aboriginal perspective), and you will encounter two additional perspectives regarding

Aboriginal social research methods. First, Smith resumes her critical perspective toward decolonizing research methodologies with a collection of research projects that describe research methodologies that are “respectful, ethical, sympathetic and useful.” Importantly, they are conducted by the “insider researcher” and provide powerful, valid knowledge for community development, policy and program development.

While Chapter 5 tends to be a summary of the first part of the text, Chapter 6 begins to develop the framework for Aboriginal social work research methodologies rooted in the social movements of the 1950s and broadened by the concept of self-determinism and development of international indigenous relations after the Second World War.

The second reading, by Wayne Warry, addresses the timely role of social research in relation to the recommendations of the Royal Commission on Aboriginal Peoples (RCAP), and summarizes the connections between Aboriginal self-government, healing, and community development.

The third reading is an article by Taiaiake Alfred, a Mohawk scholar of native nationalism and indigenous traditions of government. Alfred outlines empowerment as “requickening the traditional spirit of leadership” (p. 41, Peace, Power and Righteousness – An Indigenous Manifesto, 1999), and the role of traditional values and approaches to power as guiding principles for governance. You will be encouraged to explore the ideals of an indigenous philosophy as a context for Aboriginal social work research methodologies.

In this section, you will be exploring what Smith sees as a shifting from imperialism to globalization and the associated “end of decolonization.” Smith discusses the new language of imperialism, the generation of indigenous elites who appear to have replaced cultural forms of leadership with Western versions of “boardroom chiefs” and “conference warriors.” You will review ten projects that evidence the claim that the “misappropriation of indigenous knowledge” continues to escalate, particularly in the areas of environmental sciences and medicine.
Continue to identify technical terms and concepts; you may wish to add these terms to your Glossary of Terms.
Warm-up Activity

Discuss ways in which indigenous peoples “are still trying to survive” despite claims of the end of imperialism, post-colonialism, and globalization.

Smith shares personal memories of an indigenous community and indigenous language to describe its beauty.

Briefly comment on similarities regarding Aboriginal First Nations in Canada.

Learning Activity 7.1
To ensure that you have understood the readings, write out your own answers to the following questions. These notes will help to prepare you for the assignments and exam. This work is an essential element of your course; by actively engaging with the course material you will deepen your understanding of the concepts discussed.
“Fragmentation is not an indigenous project, it is something we are recovering from”. Discuss this statement within the context of decolonization.
Summarize the ten projects currently misappropriating indigenous knowledge, according to Smith.
Having your genealogy and identity (cell-lines) stolen, patented, copied
Having the umbilical cord blood of aborted babies “farmed”
Having your cultural institutions and their rituals patented either by a non- indigenous person or by another indigenous individual
Scientific political reconstruction of a previously extinct indigenous people
Dying, and then coming back to life as a flock of sheep or variety of tomatoes
Commodifying indigenous spirituality
Creating virtual culture as authentic culture
Feeding consumption, tuberculosis of the marketplace
Creating sovereign reservations for the elite
Denial of global citizenship
Describe the new challenge for intellectual property, the “clash between science and indigenous knowledge”, and the significance of sharing resources that may help others.
Take time now to read Chapter 6, “The Indigenous Peoples’ Project: Setting A new Agenda” in the text by Smith.
In this section, you will be exploring the recent history of the social movement of indigenous peoples, its implications for Aboriginal Peoples in Canada, how the social movement has gained international status, and further implications for an Aboriginal social research agenda.
Continue to identify technical terms and concepts; you may wish to add these terms to your Glossary of Terms.
Learning Activity 7.2
To ensure that you have understood the readings, write out your own answers to the following questions. These notes will help to prepare you for the assignments and exam. This work is an essential element of your course; by actively engaging with the course material you will deepen your understanding of the concepts discussed.
Briefly discuss the current social context in which a field of indigenous research is emerging.
What are the difference(s) between the concepts of “people” and “peoples” according to Smith?

Discuss Smith’s description of social change as an “indigenous social movement which started as a movement of people and became a movement of peoples”.
Describe how international mobilization fostered a shared “sense of kinship and identity, a consciousness as distinct peoples and a political will to exist as distinct peoples”, according to Smith.
Summarize the following four processes, which Smith suggests are “critical elements of a strategic research agenda”.

Transformation:

Decolonization:

Healing:

Mobilization:

How does the framework for an indigenous research agenda differ from the research agenda of large scientific organizations, or national science research projects?
Briefly outline how repositioning of the indigenous researcher is central to an indigenous research agenda, according to Smith.
Take time now to read “The Nature of Change: Cleaning the Caribou” by W. Warry.
In this section, you will be exploring the role of social science in relation to the project of Aboriginal self-government and its implications for Aboriginal social work researchers who are dedicated to professional problem solving and strengthening the values, ethics, reciprocal relationships, and traditionalism within the Aboriginal world view.

Continue to identify technical terms and concepts; you may wish to add these terms to your Glossary of Terms.
Learning Activity 7.3

To ensure that you have understood the readings, write out your own answers to the following questions. These notes will help to prepare you for the assignments and exam. This work is an essential element of your course; by actively engaging with the course material you will deepen your understanding of the concepts discussed.

Warry writes that the Canadian government “should commit itself to the development of cultural resource centres, policy centres, and research centres on a regional basis so as to enhance Aboriginal Peoples’ capacity for self-government”. Discuss the reasoning he uses to support his statement. Do you agree, or disagree with the statement? Support your opinion with as many reasons as you can. (Be sure to cite your sources.)

Briefly outline participatory action research (PAR) and its potential value as an Aboriginal social research methodology.
Summarize the argument that the Canadian public and leadership, and the Aboriginal leadership must make Aboriginal issues, such as those identified by RCAP, a priority by committing adequate resources for community healing.

Briefly outline the potential changes that Warry refers to within the interrelated processes of Aboriginal community healing,

Aboriginal self-government and subsequent contributions of

Aboriginal Peoples in making Canada a more tolerant society.
Take time now to read “Self-Conscious Traditionalism” by T. Alfred.

In this section, you will be exploring Taiaiake Alfred’s assertion that power is a political process that was traditionally practised by Aboriginal Peoples with cultural values and forms of leadership. Following the ritual of the condolence ceremony, Taiaiake Alfred organizes a “requickening” of leadership and power with key elements of pacification, context, and duties

According to Alfred, a cultural form of leadership, based on traditionalism and cultural values must be examined for its implications for Aboriginal Peoples. This reading will provide you an opportunity to explore Taiaiake Alfred’s view and its implications for Aboriginal social work research methodologies.

Continue to identify technical terms and concepts; you may wish to add these terms to your Glossary of Terms.
Learning Activity 7.4

To ensure that you have understood the readings, write out your own answers to the following questions. These notes will help to prepare you for the assignments and exam. This work is an essential element of your course; by actively engaging with the course material you will deepen your understanding of the concepts discussed.
What does Alfred mean by “self-conscious traditionalism?”

Illustrate your understanding of the aforementioned concepts by providing examples for each of the characteristics that make up Alfred’s “contemporary ideal of a strong indigenous nation”.

Wholeness with Diversity

Shared Culture

Communication

Respect and Trust

Group Maintenance

Participatory and Consensus-based Government

Youth Empowerment

Strong Links to the Outside World

Describe how an indigenous framework for determining tribal/band membership has the power to resolve current conflicts related to the manipulation of indigenous identities.

What is the role of Aboriginal social work research methodologies in developing such a framework?

Select an indigenous/Aboriginal organization from the Glossary of Terms listed on the next page and conduct an online search for information related to the organization’s background, mandate, and contributions, if any, to the development of an indigenous research agenda.
Terminology Exercise

Generally, textbooks and instruction manuals provide a “Glossary of Terms,” or list of “Key Terms” at the end of each chapter, or as an appendix. You, however, are encouraged to give particular attention to theory, theoretical concepts, key terms, and research terminology by researching definitions for yourself throughout this course.

It is critical for you to acquire a good understanding of scientific research terminology for three reasons. The first is to acquire knowledge and skills in social work research as a preliminary step in the problem-solving process of social work practice. The second is to demonstrate an understanding of the historical impacts of colonization through Western research. And, the third is to demonstrate an understanding and the basic skills in social work research to further the decolonization of the Aboriginal Peoples in Canada.

Terminology is essential in social work practice and social work research. You will be encouraged to assemble an extensive Glossary of Terms as you proceed in this course.
Key Terms

Continue to add to your Glossary of Terms section by defining the following key terms and basic concepts for Western knowledge and social research methods. Use your textbook, dictionary, or online resources (e.g., www.m-w.com, or resources listed in Chapter 3 “Demystifying the Search for Information” in your text by Salahu-Din) to obtain a brief definition of each.

 

imperialism fragmentation
indigenous elites intellectual rights
cultural property rights global indigenous strategic alliances
international mobilization North American Indian Brotherhood (NAIB)
transformation decolonization
healing mobilization
survival recovery
development self-determination

American Indian Movement (AIM) peoples
International Indian Treaty Council of 1974 World Council of Indigenous Peoples of 1975

Economic and Social Council of United Nations International Labour Organization added Convention 197, The Convention of Indigenous Populations
United Nations Sub-Commission on the Prevention of

Discrimination and Protection of Minorities Draft Declaration for the Protection of Indigenous Peoples’ Rights (UN Working Group on Indigenous Peoples)

The post Discuss ways in which indigenous peoples “are still trying to survive” despite claims of the end of imperialism, post-colonialism, and globalization. appeared first on Accredited Research Writers.

QUICK QUOTE

Approximately 250 words